Hide and Leather are grown in labs: the new material frontier?

User Rating:  / 0
PoorBest 

In the last few years the request for biological and ecological fabrics for wardrobe and accessories it has grown. New materials as biological cotton, synthetics fibres are recycled from garbage or plastic, they are gradually taking off.

A significant innovation in this field its been supported by the researcher SUZANNE LEE, which she introduced a different prospective on the process of materials. In her book”FASHIONING THE FUTURE: TOMORROW’S WARDROBE” SUZANNE LEE explored the future fashion, with particular attention to the new fashion material. New trends will soon have to adapt for greater sustainability of the fashion industry.
For SUZANNE LEE the materials can be entirely lab products: the result will be “vegetable leather” soft and resistant adaptable for wardrobes and fabrics.
For the creation of the new material called “vegetable hide”, SUZANNE LEE took a culture of yeast and bacteria to get a similar fabric to the cellulose, the appearance of which it comes very close to that which could be defined as “vegetable leather”.

Cuoio Vegetale, Suzanne Lee

Pelle Vegetale, Suzanne Lee

 What are the features of the production of this fabric?

  • Using natural substances as sugar and green tea: the action of yeast and bacteria permits the use of this fabric to be used in the wardrobe field.
  • Reduced water use: its production would be much more sustainable than cotton fabric, in the world  every year, its wasted over 200 billion liters of water, and a large amount of electricity. 
  • Pollution emission close to zero: it would be left a small trace, compared to the process of other fabrics.
  • Complete vegetable fabric and with no toxic substances: unlike in non organic cotton fabrics that may be affected by residues of pesticides.
  • 100 % compostable.
  • Fabric is dyed by vegetable ingredients, beets and blueberries.

 The project, substained by SUZANNE LEE  and by BIO COUTURE company, it was the protagonist of the London design week 2011, promoting an agreement between the fashion world and environmental sustainability.